Video: Blythe Doll Fashion Clothing Sparkle Girlz Review

Blogged under dolls art/collecting by Tammy on Friday 30 October 2015 at 11:50 am

I take a look at Sparkle Girlz dolls clothes and how they can also (sometimes) fit Blythe dolls too.

Mini Crochet Projects

Blogged under crochet and knitting, dolls art/collecting by Tammy on Thursday 29 October 2015 at 1:26 pm

I discovered a great way to use up very small amounts of yarn - doll hats, scarves, and dresses. I’ve posted these for sale on a few doll Facebook groups I’m on, and at some point I may post them on my Etsy shop too. Amber is my current crochet clothing model.

Patterns, Tutorials, and More Crafting Goodies

Blogged under Around the Web by Tammy on Sunday 25 October 2015 at 2:36 pm

Two New Patterns

Connie’s added two new patterns to her Etsy shop and she is also running a sale there - find out the code to use to save.

Bewitching Halloween Card

Eileen shares directions for a cute Halloween card featuring witch layered die cut embellishment from the Silhouette Design Store as well as tips for hand lettering.

Halloween Skirt for a Little Girl

Sometimes improvising does not go that well, but it all turned out OK when Sarah decided to make a Halloween skirt for her daughter out of scraps from another project.

Ice Cream Yarn Review!

Who doesn’t like ice cream? What about ice cream yarn?

Jade Knotted Bracelet

This free bracelet tutorial is a good beginning level project or just a good quick one for anyone who loves colorful beads.

Beading Arts

Cyndi just can’t get enough of the color turquoise, and she is sharing a tutorial on making a soft wrap cuff bracelet using her (current) favorite color!

Art Bead Scene

Read Claire’s great interview with Sarah of Slate Studio Supplies, and get a peek behind the scenes at her work!

Snap out of it, Jean! There’s beading to be done!

Jean reviews Fast & Easy Earrings,100+ Projects, by Erica Swanson. This book is loaded with earring designs from tons of your favorite artists. You will love the inspiration you’ll get to begin creating your own beautiful earrings!

Christmas Is Close At Hand

Here are a few gift ideas Terry has put together for an individual on her Christmas list. These gift ideas should get your creative juices flowing for some on your list…whether it is for Christmas, Birthdays, Graduations, etc…

Video: Star Wars Crochet Kit Un-Boxing - Review

Blogged under Crafty Products, Crafty Videos, amigurumi, crochet and knitting by Tammy on Saturday 24 October 2015 at 5:28 pm

I take a look at all the goodies in this interesting crochet kit: Star Wars Crochet (Crochet Kits)

Video Yarn Review: Lion Brand’s Ice Cream Yarn

Blogged under Crafty Products, Crafty Videos by Tammy on Wednesday 21 October 2015 at 9:48 am

I usually try to film a number of videos at the same time. That way, I can “bank” them for editing later. I was looking over my non-edited videos, and voila! I discovered this gem from June that I recorded where I review a fairly new yarn from Lion Brand called Ice Cream Yarn.

Knotted Rainbow Gemstone Bead Bracelet

Blogged under Free Craft Projects, Jewelry Designing by Tammy on Monday 19 October 2015 at 8:55 am

First, a BIG “thank you” to PandaHall for supplying these colorful jade beads. The beads are 8mm, faceted, and dyed a bunch of different colors to create a pretty rainbow affect. When I saw them temporarily strung up, I knew I wanted to use them all together to take advantage of the color combinations and turn the strand into a piece of jewelry that I could wear with lots of different outfits.

This is a good beginner project since you don’t need a large amount of tools or supplies to make this bracelet, but it may take a few practice sessions to get the knotting down. Along with the jade beads, you will need some 1mm bleached hemp cord (at least 3 feet), small ruler, and scissors. I also find using a pair of round-nosed pliers helps me if I goof up a knot and need to pull it out. They work like little fingers.

Measure 6 inches from one end of the cord and make an overhand knot. Now string on your beads in the order you want them on, so you may want to take a little time with this so that you get the color combination you want. For example, I did not want two of the same color beads next to each other.

Push the first bead strung up against your knot, and then tie another overhand knot, making sure to push your knot close up to the hole in the bead. You do not have to make this super snug, but you do not want tons of space between knots and beads either. Keep doing this - move a bead, knot, move a bead, knot - until you have six inches strung up.

Obviously, you could make this longer with adding more beads. I used up all but about 4 or so beads from the original bead strand. If you wanted a chunkier look, you could use two strands of beads, make the center part 12 inches instead of six, and then wrap the bracelet around your wrist twice before securing it.

Once you get all the beads strung on and knotted, measure another six inches of hemp and cut any remaining hemp so that you have two 6 inch strands of hemp on either side of the bracelet.

To secure it to your wrist (and you probably need someone to help you do this), just tie the tie the two six inch pieces of hemp together into a bow.

Beads, Paper-Art, Stitching, and More Bead Links

Blogged under Around the Web by Tammy on Sunday 18 October 2015 at 12:57 pm

Art Bead Scene

Ever wondered about how lampwork glass beads turn from glossy little pieces of beauty into smooth, silky velvet? Read all about it here with Julie’s post on etching!

SAL Diamond Six

Connie’s posted the sixth section of her free stitch along (SAL). The cross stitch design would also be suitable for beading.

Want to Learn to Knit?

Maybe this new book is for you. Check out this quick video book review!

Postcard Art Inspiration

Eileen shares a collection of postcard art by various artists and explains the methods used. Do you know the benefits of postcard art as a learning tool?

Beading Arts

Were you a fan of button covers back in the day? Cyndi has worked up an easy bead embroidery project that will allow you to put them to good use…and they can be interchanged!

Snap out of it, Jean! There’s beading to be done!

Jean reviews Beadweaving Beyond the Basics, 24 Beading Designs Using Seed Beads, Crystals, Two-Hole Beads and More by Kassie Shaw. Also,comment to win a GIVEAWAY of this lovely book!

Making Rocks into Beads

Blogged under Crafty Videos, Jewelry Designing by Tammy on Saturday 17 October 2015 at 4:47 pm

Arbeads is one of the many Youtube channels I subscribe to, and I especially enjoy the company’s Artbeads Cafe series. This video is amazing and shows the process of how stones are selected and then turned into gemstone beads.

Inadvertent Doll Doctor - Fiction Becomes Fact!

Blogged under dolls art/collecting by Tammy on Wednesday 14 October 2015 at 9:44 am

Starting around July of this past summer, after I finally published my novel Crafting Memories, I started on another fictional story idea I have had for a few years. Without going into lots of detail about what the story entails, my protagonist is involved with doll collecting and doll crafting. I had been a doll collector myself years ago, so this is a subject that has always fascinated me.

As I started in on the project, though, I realized that my knowledge about today’s doll collecting was a little rusty. What’s a writer to do? Of course, research! And more research! And that is how I fell down the rabbit hole of doll collecting again as I remembered how much fun it is to have these small little works of art to touch and look at and arrange and rearranged.

Fast forward….I’m now a lover of Pullips and Blythe dolls. So that’s why you’ve been seeing videos on my blog as well as my Youtube channel about dolls. And, yes, I’m still working on the fictional piece, which also gave birth to a non-fiction book idea as well that I’m working on….very, very slowly because my teaching job doesn’t give me lots of writing time. But, I’m not on a deadline.

Below is my most recent Pullip acquisition, Romantic Alice. She is only my second Pullip. I show off my first Pullip here. Though I pretty much like 99% of the Pullips I’ve seen, I plan to focus on dolls like this that have a 19th century feel to them. So here she is in the box, and I started recording an “un-boxing” video (which I will post here in the future at some point), and what do you think happened?

I discovered one of her arms was broken. As I pulled her out of all the tape and plastic and metal wire, her arm kept fall off at the elbow. I pulled up her sleeve to reveal a crack. Yikes!

Now I will back peddle a little and explain that she is a 2011 release, and according to a disclaimer on Pullip Style, which is the web site I purchased her from, Pullips are known for issues like this, especially older ones.

But, whaaaa! My new dolly has a broken arm. Yes, I was kind of freaking out and super disappointed. I contacted the company, and the owner (I believe) send me various types of instructions about how to pull the arm out of the socket.

It took awhile. I finally had to hold the loop part with a pair of pliers and pull really hard. I was so worried I was going to break something else on her. Finally, though, I got the arm out. The company sent me a new one, and it popped right in without any problems.

I managed to get all of her stock clothing back on, and the arm stayed the entire time. As I dealt with all of this, I started to think about the protagonist in my story, who would think my situation was easy peasy since she is an expert, and cliches like “art imitates life” and “truth is stranger than fiction” swirled around in my brain. Though, these would probably be switched around to “life imitates art,” right? Not that I want to buy another doll with a broken arm any time soon, but it gave me a little taste of what my character does. I will have to write this into one of the scenes in the book now!

Video: Book Review: First Knits

Blogged under Good Books by Tammy on Tuesday 13 October 2015 at 11:53 am

I take a look at First Knits: Simple Projects for Knitters (First Crafts) in this video-based book review.

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